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New law for homeowners with Japanese Knotweed

Japanese Knotweed has been described by the Environment Agency as the most destructive, aggressive and invasive plant in the country.

Two home owners in Wales recently won a court case when they sued Network Rail after Japanese knotweed spread into their gardens.

Each man was awarded £15,000 in damages after the court decided that Japanese knotweed is a ‘nuisance’ and ‘natural hazard’ that land owners must keep under control.

In this hot summer weather it will grow rapidly, by up to 10cm a day pushing up through cracks in concrete, cavity walls and drains. The longer it is left, the further its underground root system will spread and the more costly it will be to tackle.

Japanese knotweed will quickly spread and become established if left untreated and can cause damage to buildings and render them unsellable, resulting in a property unable to be sold on the open market until a treatment plan is implemented.

You could also face criminal charges if you try to hide the presence of Japanese knotweed when selling a property. There is a requirement to disclose its presence on the Law Society’s TA6 form. According to Environet, an estimated 2% of properties in the UK are directly affected by knotweed, this could result in approximately 1,000 cases each year of knotweed concealment during property transactions.

House Buyer Bureau will purchase your property even if it has Japanese Knotweed.  Selling privately would mean you would have to pay for the expensive removal or allow time for treatment, whereas selling to us means you can walk away and leave us to sort out the problem.